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Remember the Genocide by BullMoose1912 Remember the Genocide by BullMoose1912

From Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States:



Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island's beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:
"They... brought us parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things, which they exchanged for the glass beads and hawks' bells. They willingly traded everything they owned.... They were well-built, with good bodies and handsome features.... They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance. They have no iron. Their spears are made of cane.... They would make fine servants.... With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want."
These Arawaks of the Bahama Islands were much like Indians on the mainland, who were remarkable (European observers were to say again and again) for their hospitality, their belief in sharing. These traits did not stand out in the Europe of the Renaissance, dominated as it was by the religion of popes, the government of kings, the frenzy for money that marked Western civilization and its first messenger to the Americas, Christopher Columbus.
Columbus wrote:
"As soon as I arrived in the Indies, on the first Island which I found, I took some of the natives by force in order that they might learn and might give me information of whatever there is in these parts."
The information that Columbus wanted most was: Where is the gold?
****
The Indians, Columbus reported, "are so naive and so free with their possessions that no one who has not witnessed them would believe it. When you ask for something they have, they never say no. To the contrary, they offer to share with anyone...." He concluded his report by asking for a little help from their Majesties, and in return he would bring them from his next voyage "as much gold as they need . . . and as many slaves as they ask." He was full of religious talk: "Thus the eternal God, our Lord, gives victory to those who follow His way over apparent impossibilities."
Because of Columbus's exaggerated report and promises, his second expedition was given seventeen ships and more than twelve hundred men. The aim was clear: slaves and gold. They went from island to island in the Caribbean, taking Indians as captives. But as word spread of the Europeans' intent they found more and more empty villages. On Haiti, they found that the sailors left behind at Fort Navidad had been killed in a battle with the Indians, after they had roamed the island in gangs looking for gold, taking women and children as slaves for sex and labor.
Now, from his base on Haiti, Columbus sent expedition after expedition into the interior. They found no gold fields, but had to fill up the ships returning to Spain with some kind of dividend. In the year 1495, they went on a great slave raid, rounded up fifteen hundred Arawak men, women, and children, put them in pens guarded by Spaniards and dogs, then picked the five hundred best specimens to load onto ships. Of those five hundred, two hundred died en route. The rest arrived alive in Spain and were put up for sale by the archdeacon of the town, who reported that, although the slaves were "naked as the day they were born," they showed "no more embarrassment than animals." Columbus later wrote: "Let us in the name of the Holy Trinity go on sending all the slaves that can be sold."
But too many of the slaves died in captivity. And so Columbus, desperate to pay back dividends to those who had invested, had to make good his promise to fill the ships with gold. In the province of Cicao on Haiti, where he and his men imagined huge gold fields to exist, they ordered all persons fourteen years or older to collect a certain quantity of gold every three months. When they brought it, they were given copper tokens to hang around their necks. Indians found without a copper token had their hands cut off and bled to death.
The Indians had been given an impossible task. The only gold around was bits of dust garnered from the streams. So they fled, were hunted down with dogs, and were killed.
Trying to put together an army of resistance, the Arawaks faced Spaniards who had armor, muskets, swords, horses. When the Spaniards took prisoners they hanged them or burned them to death. Among the Arawaks, mass suicides began, with cassava poison. Infants were killed to save them from the Spaniards. In two years, through murder, mutilation, or suicide, half of the 250,000 Indians on Haiti were dead.
When it became clear that there was no gold left, the Indians were taken as slave labor on huge estates, known later as encomiendas. They were worked at a ferocious pace, and died by the thousands. By the year 1515, there were perhaps fifty thousand Indians left. By 1550, there were five hundred. A report of the year 1650 shows none of the original Arawaks or their descendants left on the island.
The chief source-and, on many matters the only source-of in formation about what happened on the islands after Columbus came is Bartolome de las Casas, who, as a young priest, participated in the conquest of Cuba. For a time he owned a plantation on which Indian slaves worked, but he gave that up and became a vehement critic of Spanish cruelty.
*****
In Book Two of his History of the Indies, Las Casas (who at first urged replacing Indians by black slaves, thinking they were stronger and would survive, but later relented when he saw the effects on blacks) tells about the treatment of the Indians by the Spaniards. It is a unique account and deserves to be quoted at length:
"Endless testimonies . . . prove the mild and pacific temperament of the natives.... But our work was to exasperate, ravage, kill, mangle and destroy; small wonder, then, if they tried to kill one of us now and then.... The admiral, it is true, was blind as those who came after him, and he was so anxious to please the King that he committed irreparable crimes against the Indians..."
Las Casas tells how the Spaniards "grew more conceited every day" and after a while refused to walk any distance. They "rode the backs of Indians if they were in a hurry" or were carried on hammocks by Indians running in relays. "In this case they also had Indians carry large leaves to shade them from the sun and others to fan them with goose wings."
Total control led to total cruelty. The Spaniards "thought nothing of knifing Indians by tens and twenties and of cutting slices off them to test the sharpness of their blades." Las Casas tells how "two of these so-called Christians met two Indian boys one day, each carrying a parrot; they took the parrots and for fun beheaded the boys."
The Indians' attempts to defend themselves failed. And when they ran off into the hills they were found and killed. So, Las Casas reports. "they suffered and died in the mines and other labors in desperate silence, knowing not a soul in the world to whom they could tun for help." He describes their work in the mines:
"... mountains are stripped from top to bottom and bottom to top a thousand times; they dig, split rocks, move stones, and carry dirt on their backs to wash it in the rivers, while those who wash gold stay in the water all the time with their backs bent so constantly it breaks them; and when water invades the mines, the most arduous task of all is to dry the mines by scooping up pansful of water and throwing it up outside....
After each six or eight months' work in the mines, which was the time required of each crew to dig enough gold for melting, up to a third of the men died. While the men were sent many miles away to the mines, the wives remained to work the soil, forced into the excruciating job of digging and making thousands of hills for cassava plants.
Thus husbands and wives were together only once every eight or ten months and when they met they were so exhausted and depressed on both sides . . . they ceased to procreate. As for the newly born, they died early because their mothers, overworked and famished, had no milk to nurse them, and for this reason, while I was in Cuba, 7000 children died in three months. Some mothers even drowned their babies from sheer desperation.... In this way, husbands died in the mines, wives died at work, and children died from lack of milk . . . and in a short time this land which was so great, so powerful and fertile ... was depopulated.... My eyes have seen these acts so foreign to human nature, and now I tremble as I write...."
When he arrived on Hispaniola in 1508, Las Casas says, "there were 60,000 people living on this island, including the Indians; so that from 1494 to 1508, over three million people had perished from war, slavery, and the mines. Who in future generations will believe this? I myself writing it as a knowledgeable eyewitness can hardly believe it...."
Thus began the history, five hundred years ago, of the European invasion of the Indian settlements in the Americas. That beginning, when you read Las Casas-even if his figures are exaggerations (were there 3 million Indians to begin with, as he says, or less than a million, as some historians have calculated, or 8 million as others now believe?) is conquest, slavery, death. When we read the history books given to children in the United States, it all starts with heroic adventure-there is no bloodshed-and Columbus Day is a celebration.
*****
The treatment of heroes (Columbus) and their victims (the Arawaks) the quiet acceptance of conquest and murder in the name of progress-is only one aspect of a certain approach to history, in which the past is told from the point of view of governments, conquerors, diplomats, leaders. It is as if they, like Columbus, deserve universal acceptance, as if they-the Founding Fathers, Jackson, Lincoln, Wilson, Roosevelt, Kennedy, the leading members of Congress, the famous Justices of the Supreme Court-represent the nation as a whole. The pretense is that there really is such a thing as "the United States," subject to occasional conflicts and quarrels, but fundamentally a community of people with common interests. It is as if there really is a "national interest" represented in the Constitution, in territorial expansion, in the laws passed by Congress, the decisions of the courts, the development of capitalism, the culture of education and the mass media.
"History is the memory of states," wrote Henry Kissinger in his first book, A World Restored, in which he proceeded to tell the history of nineteenth-century Europe from the viewpoint of the leaders of Austria and England, ignoring the millions who suffered from those states men's policies. From his standpoint, the "peace" that Europe had before the French Revolution was "restored" by the diplomacy of a few national leaders.
But for factory workers in England, farmers in France, colored people in Asia and Africa, women and children everywhere except in the upper classes, it was a world of conquest, violence, hunger, exploitation-a world not restored but disintegrated.
*****
When the Pilgrims came to New England they too were coming not to vacant land but to territory inhabited by tribes of Indians. The governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, John Winthrop, created the excuse to take Indian land by declaring the area legally a "vacuum." The Indians, he said, had not "subdued" the land, and therefore had only a "natural" right to it, but not a "civil right." A "natural right" did not have legal standing.
The Puritans also appealed to the Bible, Psalms 2:8: "Ask of me, and I shall give thee, the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession." And to justify their use of force to take the land, they cited Romans 13:2: "Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation."
*****
The Indian population of 10 million that lived north of Mexico when Columbus came would ultimately be reduced to less than a million. Huge numbers of Indians would die from diseases introduced by the whites. A Dutch traveler in New Netherland wrote in 1656 that "the Indians . . . affirm, that before the arrival of the Christians, and before the smallpox broke out amongst them, they were ten times as numerous as they now are, and that their population had been melted down by this disease, whereof nine-tenths of them have died." When the English first settled Martha's Vineyard in 1642, the Wampanoags there numbered perhaps three thousand. There were no wars on that island, but by 1764, only 313 Indians were left there. Similarly, Block Island Indians numbered perhaps 1,200 to 1,500 in 1662, and by 1774 were reduced to fifty-one.
Behind the English invasion of North America, behind their massacre of Indians, their deception, their brutality, was that special powerful drive born in civilizations based on private property. It was a morally ambiguous drive; the need for space, for land, was a real human need. But in conditions of scarcity, in a barbarous epoch of history ruled by competition, this human need was transformed into the murder of whole peoples.

:iconnon-commercial: :iconcopyleftplz:
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:iconconservative76:
Conservative76 Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2015
Because the Native American tribes were not already killing each other left and right.  Show me ONE society or civilization in history that did not conquer and kill to acquire land. 

If you take Zinn seriously, you deserve the politicized ignorance you acquire.
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:iconkrysnha:
Krysnha Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2015
Humans will never learn, wi will always commit the same mistaken over and over again, sadly
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:icontevo77777:
Tevo77777 Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2014  Student Writer
This is one thing of yours I can really agree with.
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:iconkevin2097:
Kevin2097 Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2014  Hobbyist Filmographer
I fee l you
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:iconjohnfarallo:
JohnFarallo Featured By Owner May 9, 2014
   That s History kid human beings aren't very nice and Italians are even worse!LOL I will try to change the history if I can…... I might be able to do that some day I have been reading stuff...
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:iconjoeisbadass:
joeisbadass Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
We should indeed learn the history and our past mistakes, but we should also consider that horrible deeds like this are akin to all groups, religions, and politics, Christians, Americans, Communists, Atheists, Pagans, Nazis, Aztecs, Egyptians, etc., etc., etc. and we should also consider the good that these groups have done as well
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:iconsolitairemarauder:
SolitaireMarauder Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2013
Aztecs had a literally bloody religion, ok. They deserved what it happened? probably....not strange that 99% of Cortezīs army when he took Tenotchitlan was of mexican natives..but the rest? Those allied with the Spanish received dignity treatment, by the way? were treated as equals? In fact, those barbaric customs of the Aztecs gave birth to a series of PLAIN LIES on part of the conquerors, like Muiscaīs Cannibalism or Incaīs sacrifice of Acklla Virgins. 
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2013
Yes, remember the genocide. Then the Spanish came along and converted and shut down the blood-soaked temples of human sacrifice and stopped the genocide.  :)

Oh, what, you thought the pre-Columbian natives were a bunch of tree-hugging pacifists?

How about Howard Zinn worries about the genocide of the Midianites...?
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:iconfreespeechguy:
FreeSpeechGuy Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2014
If I could like your comment I would. :)
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:iconi-wish-i-had-anangel:
and the genocide of the British in North America, Australia and South Africa? and the genocide over the indians of north america!?!?!?!?
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:iconjohnfarallo:
JohnFarallo Featured By Owner May 9, 2014
thats a lot of genocides! there have been a lot of great farmers and peasants in history you never hear about them
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:iconorkideh84:
Orkideh84 Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Featured! :) -> [link]
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:icondr-watson-here:
Dr-Watson-Here Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
ummm misses brisbeh is rilly hettttt milf of teh yeer 420
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:iconbullmoose1912:
BullMoose1912 Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I thought you hated Secret of NIMH.
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:icondr-watson-here:
Dr-Watson-Here Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2012
It's meh, I still like the animation. But I still can't understand how girls find Justin hot.
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:iconbullmoose1912:
BullMoose1912 Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Probably the same reason why people have BasilXOlivia as their OTP.
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:icondr-watson-here:
Dr-Watson-Here Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
Well those people need to see my videya of my much better coupling
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:iconmarktwospirit:
marktwospirit Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you for sharing something that reveals the true history of Columbus. The fact that we do not appreciate what happened then, unfortunately means we are still doomed to repeat the same idiotic genocide in our present and future. A kind of celebration of a curse of the greed of white Europeans of the time.
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:icondocmagnus:
docmagnus Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The Columbus myth always kind of confuses. So, this guy re-discovers a continent while looking for China (remember, the Vikings came first, and let's not forget the Indians), and then, never once admitting that he's in error goes on to run one of the worst colonial regimes in history, setting the example for every empire in the Americas ever after, and he's hailed as a hero? The hell!?
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:iconravajava:
Ravajava Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
I find the backlash agianst this funny and sad at the same time.
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:icondragonquestwes:
DragonQuestWes Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
True fact:

A statue of Christopher Columbus was taken down in Venezuela and instead there was a day called "Day of Indigenous Resistance."
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:iconthelightswentoutin99:
TheLightsWentOutIn99 Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2012  Student Writer
True fact:

That was PR work done at the behest of Hugo Chavez.
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:iconjgraham1993:
jgraham1993 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
WE are all human, lets just treat every one like a human. no one is better so you don't need to kiss ass. and no one is worse so you don't have to wipe ass.
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:icons-p-obrien:
S-P-OBrien Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah... we get it: You're one of those :roll eyes:
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:iconsonrouge:
sonrouge Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
Cry me a river, build a bridge, and get over it.
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:icongorilla-ink:
goRillA-iNK Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Student General Artist
Remember the Genocide?
At one time or another genocide or attempted genocide took place.
And I'm sure that even though people should have moved on and stopped trying to wipe one another out,
it will happen again and again...in some shape or fashion.

Sadly history has a nasty way of repeating it's self,
however this does not excuse the idea or desire for one group of people or another to seek total annihilation of any race.

...if you really are quoting Howard Zinn's People's History of the Unite States,
you should give credit where and when credit is do.
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:iconbullmoose1912:
BullMoose1912 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes I am. I'll go quote that.
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:iconpinkispractical:
PinkisPractical Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Student General Artist
People have done some horrible things and used verses out of context to support it. Tragic.
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:iconblamethe1st:
BlameThe1st Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
One of my friends actually debunked this myth in one of his essays: [link]
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:iconthelightswentoutin99:
TheLightsWentOutIn99 Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2012  Student Writer
Your friend's accounts are logically and historically flawed. For example, Ericsson's encounter with the natives does not hold true for every group of American natives across both continents. There were peaceful societies, violent societies, outright genocidal societies--generally any demeanor you can think of.

Your friend also very carefully selects which parts of "myths" and history he examines. For example, Cortez did much more than build Mexico City after the fall of the Aztecs. He carved up the Aztec Empire, enslaved the peoples there, and basically ran Central America as a series of gigantic slave plantations, with huge losses in the native population due to overwork and disease.
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:iconblamethe1st:
BlameThe1st Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
True. But even that dispels the politically correct myth that the Native Americans were all peaceful and lovey-dovey until the evil Europeans showed up and ruined everything.
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:iconthelightswentoutin99:
TheLightsWentOutIn99 Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2012  Student Writer
That's the "noble savage" myth that was around a long time before the current PC nonsense.
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:iconblamethe1st:
BlameThe1st Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, and it was also the genesis of it.
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:iconkoticneutralftw:
KOticneutralFTW Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Are you quoting Howard Zinn's People's History of the Unite States?
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:iconbullmoose1912:
BullMoose1912 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yep. I'll go quote that. Sorry.
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:iconkoticneutralftw:
KOticneutralFTW Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
No problem, I just recognized it from my 10th grade history class.
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:iconbullmoose1912:
BullMoose1912 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, same here. High school American history for me was also largely based on Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States. Though I think that was because I went to school in a city that touched water. If it's a city that touches water, chances are it's population is going to be largely liberal and/or leftist.
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:iconnurizin:
NurIzin Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2012
you can't be liberal AND leftist, liberalism is the main right-wing ideology.
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:iconbullmoose1912:
BullMoose1912 Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
In Europe it is. In America liberal means center-left like FDR, Kennedy, or Teddy Roosevelt. What in Europe is called progressive or social-democrat. It also happens to be a snarl world used by Republicans, though it's sort of been replaced by socialist recently.

I have to remember that not everyone on DA is familiar with American political terms.
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:iconnurizin:
NurIzin Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
Liberalism is the name of an ideology and an economical dogma, it can't have different meaning according to the country. While I understand that if we compare them to the Republicans they could be seen as "center-leftists", from a socialist perpective they are clearly not.
Liberalism was created by Adam Smith and David Ricardo : the ideology stands for : non-regulated economy, market economy, defense of private property, a state that nearly never intervenes in economy, concurrence, and so on and so on... In two words, liberalism is what the Republican party and the "Libertarian" party stands for.
Kennedy and FDR were still liberals, but with keynesian principles, so, a bit closer to social-democracy, but certainly not social-democrats, as they were acting to save capitalism from collapsing.They were actually less liberal than Republicans. "Teddy" Roosevelt was an eugenist, an imperialist and a racist anti-amerindian, he deserves nothing but despise.

While liberalism of French and "American" revolutionnaries was indeed more of leftist tendency, while indeed Democrats are more in favor of abortion, gay rights and so on, it doesn't make of them center-leftists at all.
As marxists or Marx-inspirated, American political terms have asolutly no value, only international ones and marxist ones matter. liberalism fights for individulalism and market/capitalist economy, it defends private property, as consequent, this is a right-wing ideology, and when it's progressive about gays, abortion and so on... then it's a center-right wing ideology. But certainly not a center-left one.
In international political spectrum, center-left starts with social-democrats, an ideology that is born from marxism, but that found that it was way too radical, so, social-democrats are what we could call reformist socialists. With time, they gave up more and more the marxist basis. The only center-left candidates I know in USA are Jill Stein and Ralph Nader. Obama is clearly a guy of the right-wing on many many points, but centrist in matter of health and education.
There are parties of all ideologies in USA, so, as republican and democrat parties aren't the only ones, you've to apply the international spectrum, otherwise it's not scientifically correct.
-There are communist parties (APL, CPUSA (extreme-left),
-socialist parties (left),
-social-democrat and environnementalist parties (center-left),
-parties that are progressive/ politically liberal (centrist part) in matter of society, but economically liberal as well (rightist part) (center-right, progressive part of Democrat party),
- somes are neoliberals and quite conservative but not too radical (right wing : a part of Democrats, the moderate side of Republicans),
-somes are and neoliberal, and conservative (hard right-wing : Republicans in general, Reagan, tatcher are good historical examples of this hard extremely liberal right wing),
-and some are both neoliberal and conservative, but very religious and traditionnalist (extreme-right wing : Republicans, people such as Santorum, Perry, Romney these last days, Palin, and so on...)
-and of course the nazi parties, white suprematists and so on, who are the far-right wing . Note that in Western Europe, nazis can't have a party and can't express their ideology in public, otherwise they are punished by law.

Oh, and I forgot the "Libertarians", who are actually just extreme liberals.
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:iconkoticneutralftw:
KOticneutralFTW Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I can see that. My class contrasted Zinn's book with A Patriot's History of the United States by Larry Scheikart and Michail Allen. All that was in addition to the text book. Getting a good amount of information from two opposed views and having the "undiluted facts" at hand was a good way of teaching the class. It's something I wish all history teachers would do.
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:icontimid-wolf:
timid-wolf Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
And yet the native americans are still the ethnic group that suffers most in the United States. Reservations have the highest unemployment rates, violent crime rates, rapes, poverty rates, etc.
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:iconjgraham1993:
jgraham1993 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
I'm always astonished that people think they can tell what happened over five hundred years ago.

I'm half cherokee and I don't think any of this is a big deal. Get over it people.
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:icons-p-obrien:
S-P-OBrien Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
well said
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:icongraeystone:
Graeystone Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
Its called "White Liberal Guilt/Self-Loathing." I'm supposed to feel like crap even if my ancestors didn't do anything wrong.

I also don't buy into the lie that the Tribes were living peacefully until Columbus came to the New World. The Aztecs and a few other Tribes were doing some real brutal things long before Columbus showed up.
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:iconscotpens:
scotpens Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2014
And why should anyone feel like crap even if their ancestors DID a lot of bad stuff? Guilt isn't passed through the DNA.  You're responsible for your own acts and nobody else's.
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:iconjgraham1993:
jgraham1993 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
well, my ancestors lived in Canada and made a living off stealing horses (they were kicked out of Canada for it)

So do I really think native Americans are NOT completely innocent. of coarse not they are just as human anyone else(The proof is me a product of a white German/Scottish man and British/Cherokee woman)
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:icons-p-obrien:
S-P-OBrien Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
including slavery and raid's on other villages. Good points
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:iconbullmoose1912:
BullMoose1912 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I don't feel personal guilt about it. It happened over 500 years ago. Besides, he was Italian, which I'm not.

And I know that the tribes weren't all peaceful. I don't buy that Noble Savage ideology.

The point is that certain stuff is taken out of popular history because it doesn't reflect well for those in power. Howard Zinn definitely has an agenda, but keep in mind that before A People's History of the United States was written nothing like this really existed. His agenda was to show a side of history that was very much marginalized at the time and still is for many today, that of women, people of color, labor, and everyday life in general.

People just feel like crap because they get defensive about learning something that reflects against the worldview they developed throughout their lives. You can't just sweep stuff like this under the rug.
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:icongraeystone:
Graeystone Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2012
A good book I've read is named Treason in America is a section about how Indians got screwed by racists with a genocide agenda.

One interesting part is where Ben Franklin made the following observation during his lifetime. He noted that there were remains of roads and burial sites throughout the colonies that could only have been made by a civilization similar to the current European one. He also theorized this civilization was as large as what would become the US (at the time) and that it was created by the ancestors of the then current Indians. What he did not know is what happened to this civilization - war, disease, natural disaster, that reduced its people to the Tribes that European explorers first encountered.
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